Sept 23rd, 2019 – Quick Sale Heads Up: There’s currently a deal on the original CycleOps/Saris Hammer

Sept 23rd, 2019 – Quick Sale Heads Up: There’s currently a deal on the original CycleOps/Saris Hammer (H1) down to $699, from the usual $1,000.  This is basically on clearance, given its been superseded by the Hammer 2 (H2) and just announced H3 units. Though the H1 did actually get a substantial firmware update this past summer that increases accuracy on sprints considerably. CycleOps…err…now Saris is getting a bit ahead of the Eurobike show announcement flood by starting early. Today they’ve announced three new products. First, is this post – the Saris H3 (Hammer 3) trainer. This trainer gets a bit quieter while also getting a bit more accurate. Atop that they’ve announced their $1,199 MP1 motion platform that they previewed last year at Eurobike. And finally, they’ve announced their $329 TD1 trainer desk. I’ll be discussing those two products in another post once I get more hands-on time with them in the DCR Cave. For now though, I’ve been rockin’ the H3 trainer over the last few weeks and have a pretty good grasp of things. I’ve been putting it through the ringer of apps including Zwift, TrainerRoad, and Rouvy. And of course, have a good idea of where it sits competitively t...

Telling Short, Memorable Stories From Your Life: ‘My Secret Pepsi Plot’

An invitation to students to tell a meaningful story in a limited number of words, with an example from The Times’s Lives column to help. Our new Mentor Text series spotlights writing from The Times that students can learn from and emulate. This entry, like several others we are publishing, looks at the skills prized in narrative writing. We are starting with this genre to help support students participating in our 2019 Personal Narrative Essay Contest. Our Personal Narrative Essay Contest is inspired by The New York Times’s Lives column, which ran from 1996 to 2017 and featured “short, powerful stories about meaningful life experiences.” The editor of the column once posted some advice on “How to Write a Lives Essay” to guide those who submitted to the column annually. Much of that advice applies to our contest as well. Better to start from something very simple that you think is interesting (an incident, a person) and expand upon it, rather than a large idea that you then have to fit into a short essay. For example, start with “the day the Santa Claus in the mall asked me on a date” rather than “the state of affairs that is dating in an older age bracket.” This advice is simil...